Monthly Archives: October 2014

Best Mental State for skiing

It is extremely difficult to do anything requiring skill if either you don’t believe that you are capable of it, or if your mental state at the time is not conducive.  This particularly applies to skiing. First you have to believe it’s possible for you.

gymnast

This is of particular interest to us skiers, because we are frequently challenged by the circumstances we have gone out looking for, in such a way that our mental equilibrium is disturbed by apprehension or even fear.

To be a controlled skier, or skiing in control in times of perceived extreme challenge, what we need first is control of our minds. We need the best mental state. Click here for pdf  Continue reading

Should you be skiing on one leg? Perhaps.

Skiing on one leg?

A further free extract from “Controlled Skiing”, my upcoming book taking a different slant on how to develop your ability to ski in control at all times on all pistes.

On one leg? Not literally perhaps, although it is perfectly possible, as you can see.

David Swedlow demonstrating.

David Swedlow demonstrating.

Elsewhere in the book we have considered what it is makes a ski perform the functions we want it to.  Mostly these functions are either changing direction, or skidding to resist accelerative onward motion.  In all cases this involves tilting the ski and bending the ski. Continue reading

Ski in Control using your mind

Ski in Control using your mind.
braindiagram

This morning my long suffering wife made some smarty-pants comment about my memory being somewhat suspect.  Dammit she’s right.

The ensuing conversation (not a heated debate) raised an interesting issue related to skiing, and how to ski in control.  Why is it, we wondered, that memorising things has never been that easy even when we were young?  And yet once we know how to do something, there is no need to memorise it.  Once you know something, memory is not required.  This can lead to difficulties – if you have practiced “doing turns” sufficiently often for example you will have trapped yourself into a very limited kind of skiing from which escape and further development will be jolly difficult, because “doing turns” is not an appropriate concept. Continue reading