Monthly Archives: November 2014

Skilful skiing requires experiment

Every experiment is a good experiment. Except one. That is the one the outcome of which you do not ascertain. That experiment is useless.

An experiment cannot go “wrong”. You do an experiment and something will happen or become manifest. It doesn’t matter what happens. It could be in this direction, or that direction. It could be positive or negative. Black or white. Hotter or colder. Faster or slower. Every result is a worthwhile result.

Every experiment is a GOOD experiment.  Except one!

Every experiment is a GOOD experiment. Except one!

It’s exactly the same with us and our skiing. Learning controlled skiing requires experimentation. What it illustrates is “The Kneed to Knowtice”. New words, invented by me – I figure if Dr. Johnson could do it, so can I ! Good, effective experimenting is a skill, and can lead to skilful skiing. Continue reading

Skilful skiing – why watching an expert doesn’t work

 

Took me years to realise that you will never develop skilful controlled skiing  – or anything else physical – by watching an expert do it, or looking at pictures.  In fact the very worst thing you can do is watch an expert. It’s depressing, because you can’t see what they are really doing.  That’s why on our skiing courses we spend a lot of time on the understandings.

BEX_dispenser pic

Skilful skiing – not learnt by watching others.

If you could learn by watching I could play concert piano like Ashkenazy, and golf like Tiger Woods.  Whereas in fact, I can play concert piano like Tiger Woods, and golf like Validimir Ashkenazy !

Anybody can become a skilful controlled skier. Anybody. It is nonsense to suppose that only “born athletes” (there is no such thing ) can do it. The potential to become a first rate skier does not suddenly atrophy when you get to forty. Neither is it closed off to you if you are born female.  Anybody can do it and it is never too late.  What you need is a better style of teaching and learning than most people get access to. Usually something with a bit less “gung-ho”. Continue reading