Category Archives: Ski Instruction

Skiing courses and Self Confidence. Part 2

Skiing courses often do not address self confidence issues.  Self confidence is built by you as I explained a week or so ago in part 1.

Falling skier

We all do it, even the experts. Better Skiing technique helps!

I identified some of the stressors that work against you when you are building your self confidence.  Here are some, again –

  • expectations of disaster
  • negative mental images
  • a belief that you may not be up to the job.
  • thoughts of failure or inadequacy
  • thoroughly misplaced perceptions of the next bit of slope – an endless list really.

All of these have a predictive quality about them; they are forecasts.  Forecasts are seldom right.  Read on  Continue reading

Self confidence

Self confidence in skiing is the hardest part of skiing.  It’s much more difficult than all those issues of technique.  I’ll make this the first part of a multi-part post – which is my way of saying I’m not sure what it will stretch to!

In chapter 12 of my book Ski In Control:how to ski ANY piste anywhere in full control  I expand a little on this issue.  It is perfectly possible for you to keep all the stressor factors under your control.  You can build your self confidence.

Positive feedback loops.

First of all it’s to do with controlling positive feedback loops.  Here’s one describing cattle stampedes.  Once a critical number of cattle start running – no specific threat is required – it sets up a panic in some others.  That sets them running and the increased number raises the panic level, and it just keeps self-reinforcing.  It also applies to human ones – why everyone runs for the same exit door – no one stops to observe and think.

Self confidence while skiing

Each of these reinforces the other, over and over again

Above all, the good news is that regarding your own skiing you can work on this topic l-o-n-g before you head for the slopes.  In fact it works best when you are safe at home.

In my book I differentiate between ‘external’ and ‘internally generated’ stressors.   Continue reading

Skiing-with-Confidence: How to build yours.

Skiing-with-confidence makes all the difference between enjoying it, and not doing.  But the kind of thing in the picture, just doesn’t work.  There is no point in someone, or ourselves telling us to “Be Confident”.  If it were that easy it would not even be a topic,  never mind one as important as it is.  You might just as well say “Be Taller!”

This kind of thing doesn't work - just saying "Be Confident". But there is much you CAN do to get there.

This kind of thing doesn’t work – just saying “Be Confident”. But there is much you CAN do to get there.

This “just be confident” admonition is a something-for-nothing policy.  Like most attempted short cuts it saves time in getting you to somewhere that isn’t worth going in the first place.

To ski-with-confidence is a process, not an event.  You generate it internally and it does not automatically happen.  Like so much else, to be any good you have to work at it.

More, below the fold – read on  Continue reading

Self confidence

SKIING LESSONS: Get more for less.

Not a time for gross movements!

Not a time for gross movements!

Skiing lessons are a good example of the need to get more out for less in.

Watch a skilful skier skiing fast – a downhiller in a race for example – and it all looks pretty wild. Arms flailing, legs pumping, skis jumping around like jumping beans.

But in reality it’s a game of subtleties, so you need fine control, and finesse.  And that is what your own skiing is about as well. Read below the fold for more detail. Continue reading

Ski instruction needs better descriptors

Ski instruction - get them on their edges

Is this the ultimate ski design?
No!

Ski instruction is mostly delivered by ski schools and ski instructors.  Too many still use inappropriate words to convey the ideas that are most likely to help you to improve your skill.

The instructor knows what he/she means, but it’s no good if it puts the wrong idea into the pupil’s head.  Take the picture above, for example Continue reading