Ski In Control – how to ski ANY piste anywhere in full control

Ski In Control is the name of my new book at last published through and available from Amazon, or directly from me.   Paperback £12.95 postage paid, or Kindle Edition £8.99

Tom Stiansen, World Slalom Champion says “This is a great book specially for recreational skiers.  It’s a good tool for them”.

Ski In Control

Front cover of Bob’s new booki

Ski In Control has helped the very large percentage of the hundreds of skiers I have coached to develop real confidence.  They had all given up on ski schools very early on in their skiing experience because it got them nowhere.

I wrote Ski In Control specifically for recreational skiers – folk who have largely got fed up with ski schools.  In it I explain why that happens.  I show you why once you can “sort of” do it ski schools generally inhibit your progress.  Folk then tend to blame themselves for not getting better, when in fact they are not the reason.  In truth virtually everybody has the capacity to become an expert skier.  That applies irrespective of your age, your gender, or your experience.

Don’t give up.  There’s no need to.  You genuinely have the potential.

Two folk recently wrote to me to say “If it hadn’t been for you Bob I would have given up”.  There’s no need to give up or despair, read on …

Both of those skiers came to me with the belief that they could never be any good.  Neither was young.  One had been dragged around pistes by her family for years, not enjoying it and only going for their sake.   She now skis off piste as well as any colour piste.

And the other doesn’t want to and volunteers to stay on blues or reds.  She does that because that’s what she enjoys, even though she could ski the harder stuff perfectly well and perfectly safely.  She no longer has anything to prove.  The same thing applies equally to my men pupils

The 1999 Slalom World Champion, Tom Stiansen podiumed five times. At one time he was also one of the top downhillers.  He took the title off Alberto Tomba.  He reckons the book is ideal for recreational skiers.  Which I take as a very considerable pat-on-the-back.

There are endless ways to not improve.

A second approach typically taken once a skier rules out further ski school attendance, is to imagine that “getting the miles in” is what is then needed.  But that doesn’t work either.  What we then do – all of us, including me – is to find some kind of satisficing behaviours that get us down things without too much pain.   But which embed endless poor habits that end up being extremely difficult to get rid of.  So that blocks further progress as well.

As John Shedden so wisely observed back in the 70’s “People get good at what they do”.  So when what you are doing is less than optimal – beware!  You will get good at it if you practice by “getting the miles in”.  The same thing happens to skiers who take up joining parties of oftern hyper-competitive recreational skiers following “skiing guides” in pursuit of different coloured ‘medals’.  Instead, what you need is change.

What will make the difference I’m looking for?”

This begs the question – what is it holds us back.  And what is it about traditional ski instruction and that general process that puts people “on the plateau” and holds you back.  There are two primary elements :-

  • firstly, fear
  • secondly a lack of understanding of what makes skiing possible.  It is this lack which is the underpinning for the fear that is so hard to conquer.

Endlessly, I have proved that once we have got under the skin of what makes skis and skiing work, your fear is doomed.  It’s only a matter of time before you’ll have it beaten.  You come to understand how it is that a pair of slippy skis, on a sloping surface with no friction can be used to control your speed and direction.  This is the true foundation on which you will build your skiing skill.  And you can.  Believe me.

How to dispel your fears –  it’s all in the book here

It is not watching some skilful instructor doing demonstrations and demanding you copy him, that will help you become expert. Nor the study of videos of a racer as she zips through the gates – or indeed of you yourself unless you are a racer.

Instead it is when you develop your understanding of what is happening, and then do lots of personal experiments within that framework.  Perhaps with help from a coach rather than an instructor.  It’s not what you see that makes the difference it’s what you feel and how you interpret those feelings.

Check out “Ski In Control” for yourself.

If you go to Amazon books and search for Ski In Control: Bob Trueman or just click here you’ll be able to read the first chapter or so for free, and get a flavour of my approach.

If you do, and if you have any questions, or criticisms (I welcome both) you can email me – bobkski@bobski.com – you can anyway;  I welcome it.

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