Tag Archives: Learning skiing

Ski lessons for nervous skiers – see more!

Ski lessons for nervous skiers are about to get a boost!

Ski lessons for nervous skiers building up to high level performance

Ski in Control – it’s dynamic !

Picture from cover of “Ski In Control” by Bob Trueman

Clearly this skier isn’t a nervous skier, but she was once.  You can see how skiing is a dynamic activity, and one in which one is never quite “in balance”.  In the same way we’re not “in-balance” when we ride a bike, skip across some stepping stones,  or negotiate a steep path.

If you are a skier looking for ski lessons for nervous skiers, this isn’t where we start.  Rebecca above is doing things now by instinct – she hasn’t time to think about it.  And that is because she started off concentrating on one tiny movement at a time, and slowly building her own skiing edifice.

I have a new book nearing completion that will help take a nervous skier – or any other skier – “From Greens To Blacks” Continue reading

Confidence building skiing courses

Confidence building skiing courses are pretty much what I do.

One legged skier demonstrating confidence

David Swedlow demonstrating confidence

Many of the ideas from which my approach developed came from The Mental Game Plan co-authored by  Chris Shambrook Ph.D.

One of the key limitations to making progress is impatience.  It is too easy to fall into the trap of not taking the longer view.  You can help yourself enormously if you take a step back and look at your progress from a wider perspective.

I wrote a self-coaching “white paper” in 2006 on the topic of skiing courses, and how to approach them to help build confidence- I think you will enjoy it; find it here

Many pupils say things like “I ought to be able to do this by now” or “I ought to be better”.  That is nonsense, there is no reason at all why any of us should be any better at anything than we currently are.  Our life history has led us to this point.

There is no such thing as failure – you just keep going.  And all that matters is first of all to enjoy the process – that’s much more important than the outcomes.  And then to do what you can to change what you’ve got.

The effect of impatience

My strong belief is that any confidence building skiing courses worth their salt should emphasise the process, and not the outcomes.  If you focus on outcomes you may well miss the enjoyment of the learning process.

Years ago I used to teach children skiing for a company that took parties of school kids to the Alps for a week.  At the end of the week the children got a badge.  Unfortunately they all knew this, so their prime concern on day 1 was “What badge will I get?  Will it be 1 star, 2 stars, ..4 stars?”

This ruined the week for a lot of them.  They scarcely noticed each day’s skiing, fixated as they were on badges and being compared to others.  So all week was spoiled, then at the end they either got the badge they hoped for – in which case spoiling the week was pointless;  or they didn’t – which doubled up on the grief!

Never mind the final outcome – enjoy the process, you’ll get more out of it.

I’d welcome any feedback from you if you’ve signed up to the blog, so you can join in.

Ski training weather

Ski training weather comes in lots of different kinds.

Great ski training weather!

This morning the sun is out, and the temperature is rising.  A few days ago it was pouring down – my hydro electric system is simply whizzing!  Yippee!

So last week was a better opportunity for ski training than today.  No snow, no frost, and so much rain there was no temptation to step outside.  Perfect Ski training weather!

Ski training needn’t be hard work.

To improve your skiing you don’t need frost, you don’t need snow ( or plastic ) and you don’t need a ski resort.  All you need is your bedroom mirror.

Using a mirror to improve you skiing posture.

Do just three a week of my ten-minute sessions with your full length mirror and you’ll transform your skiing next season

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Ski In Control – how to ski ANY piste anywhere in full control

Ski In Control is the name of my new book at last published through and available from Amazon, or directly from me.   Paperback £12.95 postage paid, or Kindle Edition £8.99

Tom Stiansen, World Slalom Champion says “This is a great book specially for recreational skiers.  It’s a good tool for them”.

Ski In Control

Front cover of Bob’s new booki

Ski In Control has helped the very large percentage of the hundreds of skiers I have coached to develop real confidence.  They had all given up on ski schools very early on in their skiing experience because it got them nowhere.

I wrote Ski In Control specifically for recreational skiers – folk who have largely got fed up with ski schools.  In it I explain why that happens.  I show you why once you can “sort of” do it ski schools generally inhibit your progress.  Folk then tend to blame themselves for not getting better, when in fact they are not the reason.  In truth virtually everybody has the capacity to become an expert skier.  That applies irrespective of your age, your gender, or your experience.

Don’t give up.  There’s no need to.  You genuinely have the potential.

Two folk recently wrote to me to say “If it hadn’t been for you Bob I would have given up”.  There’s no need to give up or despair, read on …

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Skiing Technique – Three Big Mistakes

 

Skiing technique: mistake #2: Clumsy joint flexing.

Ski instruction - hands forward, knees bent.

Perhaps correct for her exercise but terrible for skiing!

Skiing technique can be practiced at home in your bedroom.   I want to return here to my admonition in “Mistakes #1” on posture, find it here .  If you have not already read it, I recommend reading that first.  Do the simple practices and then come back to this.

This Skiing technique issue of being able to both flex and extend your ankle, knee and hip joints – especially your ankle – is not a peripheral matter.  This is absolutely fundamental to your development of skilful skiing.  You need to develop skill in this area for your skiing to really give you satisfaction.

Here I show you some simple and safe ways to get started on this.

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Skiing technique – three big mistakes.

Skiing technique 0

We all do it, even the experts. Better Skiing technique helps!

Skiing technique : mistake #1: Standing too upright.

Skiing is dynamical in nature. Constantly moving. It is not a series of individual, and separated events but a continual stream of them. More akin to a moving stream than a line of individually separated stones.

The oft-promoted, and oft-accepted idea of being “in balance” is completely wrong.  There is never time to be “in” balance; we would have to come to a stop in order to be able to do that.  As John Shedden pointed out to me once, if you stand a brick on its end, on a flat level surface, it will be in balance.  We cannot ski like that.

Skiing technique requires instead, for our balanc-ing to be of a ‘fuzzy’ nature. So long as we are moving, we will not ever be “in” balance, we will instead be constantly moving towards that: constantly making (often unconscious) movements adjusting to changing circumstances. This is one of the reasons that skiing is difficult.  There is much you can do to change this, even while you are at home.  Continue reading

Ski Training – do it in your bedroom

Ski Training and how you can use your bedroom full-length mirror to enhance your skiing.

Do just three a week of my ten-minute sessions with your full length mirror and you’ll transform your skiing next season

Practice does not make perfect. Not automatically anyway: it might do but more than likely won’t. What practice does is to make permanent, no matter what you practice or how you practice it. So it can do more harm than good if you are not careful. As John Shedden observed, “Humans get good at what they do”. So be careful what you do.

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Image shows ski racer looking a long way ahead and skiing by FEEL

SKIING LESSONS: Get more for less.

Not a time for gross movements!

Not a time for gross movements!

Skiing lessons are a good example of the need to get more out for less in.

Watch a skilful skier skiing fast – a downhiller in a race for example – and it all looks pretty wild. Arms flailing, legs pumping, skis jumping around like jumping beans.

But in reality it’s a game of subtleties, so you need fine control, and finesse.  And that is what your own skiing is about as well. Read below the fold for more detail. Continue reading

Ski learning and philosophy

Ski Learning and philosopy

Lucius Annaeus Seneca, philosopher and statesman. Born at Cordoba c. 4 BC.

Ski learning may not at first seem closely related to Roman philosophy.  The same is not true in reverse because philosophy is a part of everything in life.  Seneca had some very powerful and useful things to say about ski learning.  Take them to heart and you will be happier. Continue reading

Ski Instruction tells you the wrong things.

Ski tows push.

Simon Trueman, the Waggoner at “The Victorian Farm” demonstrating an important skiing principle.

In most Ski Schools the Ski instruction uses bad language.  I don’t mean swearing, I mean they describe very badly what you need to do to improve your skiing.

Words are the keystrokes with which we programme our minds.  Use an incorrect or inappropriate word to describe something and you put the wrong idea, an incorrect understanding, into peoples’ minds.

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