Tag Archives: Learning skiing

SKIING LESSONS: Get more for less.

Not a time for gross movements!

Not a time for gross movements!

Skiing lessons are a good example of the need to get more out for less in.

Watch a skilful skier skiing fast – a downhiller in a race for example – and it all looks pretty wild. Arms flailing, legs pumping, skis jumping around like jumping beans.

But in reality it’s a game of subtleties, so you need fine control, and finesse.  And that is what your own skiing is about as well. Read below the fold for more detail. Continue reading

Ski learning and philosophy

Ski Learning and philosopy

Lucius Annaeus Seneca, philosopher and statesman. Born at Cordoba c. 4 BC.

Ski learning may not at first seem closely related to Roman philosophy.  The same is not true in reverse because philosophy is a part of everything in life.  Seneca had some very powerful and useful things to say about ski learning.  Take them to heart and you will be happier. Continue reading

Ski Instruction tells you the wrong things.

Ski tows push.

Simon Trueman, the Waggoner at “The Victorian Farm” demonstrating an important skiing principle.

In most Ski Schools the Ski instruction uses bad language.  I don’t mean swearing, I mean they describe very badly what you need to do to improve your skiing.

Words are the keystrokes with which we programme our minds.  Use an incorrect or inappropriate word to describe something and you put the wrong idea, an incorrect understanding, into peoples’ minds.

Continue reading

Improve your ski learning, keep to the essentials

Take them, or they won't work.

To improve your ski learning keep taking the tablets: they don’t work if you don’t take them.

To improve your ski learning– or indeed to improve skill with any technique or group of techniques, somewhat resembles looking after your health.

Your doctor diagnoses some ailment or other.  Next she prescribes a treatment that you need to keep applying.  She gives you the medication, and off you go.

You are keen to make things better, so you apply the medication regime, and sure enough things begin to improve.  They continue to improve right up to the point where you are no longer aware of the symptoms that drove you to her in the first place.  So it is with your skiing skill. Continue reading

Skiing in Control. Benefits of an open mind

Open-mindedness.

open-minded-symbol-photo-4

Ordinary people do amazing things when they don’t know they can’t. I looked up “open-mindedness” in the Thesaurus and it came up with Acceptance,  Interest,  Observance,  Receptiveness and Understanding.  All of which, it seems to me, are pretty handy when you want to develop more skilful skiing.  More of which, below the fold here – Continue reading

Goal-setting for Skiing happiness

Just like everything else in life skiing opens up endless opportunities for self-denigration, and disappointment with oneself. So we need to take positive action to counter that. And it is not that difficult when you know how.

Goal-Setting-350x474

One of the best tools to use is effective goal-setting. Effective goal-setting is not as simple as you may think, but again, it is not especially difficult in principle. Getting it right will enhance your happiness, as well as furthering your progress. Continue reading

Ski schools, why don’t they work better?

SKI SCHOOLS. WHY DON’T THEY WORK BETTER?

Perhaps because they look like this.  OK for kids, just havin’ fun.  Not much more.

Kids-Ski-School-on-the-Wiedersbergerhorn-cAlpbachtal-Seenland-Tourismu...

“Change? Change? Who wants change, things are bad enough already !”  So said Lord Salisbury.

The biggest change that comes about, and by a country mile the one that matters most, when skiers first come on one my courses, is the change in belief about what may be possible. What may be possible for them! Continue reading

Ski Learning – how to change for the better

Getting to know the shape of a ski learning curve is a powerful way to learning how to ski better, and become the skier you always wanted to be.

The general shape of any learning curve looks like this:

Sigmoind learning curve

I was reminded recently of a ski learning danger that lurks amongst our strongest motivations.  Continue reading