Tag Archives: Skiing for nervous skiers

Ski lessons for nervous skiers – see more!

Ski lessons for nervous skiers are about to get a boost!

Ski lessons for nervous skiers building up to high level performance

Ski in Control – it’s dynamic !

Picture from cover of “Ski In Control” by Bob Trueman

Clearly this skier isn’t a nervous skier, but she was once.  You can see how skiing is a dynamic activity, and one in which one is never quite “in balance”.  In the same way we’re not “in-balance” when we ride a bike, skip across some stepping stones,  or negotiate a steep path.

If you are a skier looking for ski lessons for nervous skiers, this isn’t where we start.  Rebecca above is doing things now by instinct – she hasn’t time to think about it.  And that is because she started off concentrating on one tiny movement at a time, and slowly building her own skiing edifice.

I have a new book nearing completion that will help take a nervous skier – or any other skier – “From Greens To Blacks” Continue reading

Ski courses to help combat anxiety

Ski courses to help combat anxiety seem to be in short supply.  I’ve had some thoughts about this on practical ways you can help increase your self confidence.  If you take it a small bite at a time!

When you ski, sometimes be aware of your core and where it’s headed. *

The level of anxiety felt by skiers is a function of many influences, and one of them is how near to yourself are you looking?  How far beyond your ski tips is your focus of attention?

I think it’s a two-way thing.  If our perceptions of our situation make us anxious, then we tend to focus our eyes nearer and nearer to our ski tips.  At the same time, the nearer to our ski tips we look, the less relaxed we become.  It’s a positive feed-back loop.

I can remember being on a skiing course with Sally Chapman donkey’s years ago when I was learning.  While static she got me to very closely examine the tips of my skis – every scratch, every dimple.  Took ages.  Then she said – “Right! Now you know what they look like, stop inspecting them as you ski!”  My daughter does show-jumping for fun and says her trainer says the same about her horse’s ears ! Continue reading

The best way nervous skiers can improve their skiing

The best way nervous skiers can improve their skiing is to seek out easy slopes and become skilful on those before you move on. Some helpful stuff on Skiing for seniors

Best way nervous skiers can improve their skiing

Clean, economical, skilfull skiing

I know this sounds like an obvious point, but people don’t do it.  I continue to search for the reasons why they don’t.  The skier in the picture is extremely proficient – a near perfect example of doing it well.  Also note that he is on a gentle slope.  It’s not me, but if he’s like me, this excellence seeps away as things get steeper, lumpier and bumpier!

Skiers spend sometimes quite a long time in ski schools, yet often do not have confidence they really know what to actually DO when on their own.

Disenchanted with ski schools for various reasons they wrongly conclude that the way forward is to venture forth all over the mountain.   The hope is that “getting the miles in” will provide the improvement they want.  Hope over expectation.

So what would work better?

The best way nervous skiers can improve their skiing is to be more methodical.  Learn how skill is developed.  You really do have the ability to become a skilful skier, you just need the right process.

There are two basic conditions for acquiring skill:

  • an environment that is sufficiently regular to be predictable
  • an opportunity to learn these regularities through prolonged practice

Ski schools always start you off on beginner slopes.  Quite right too.  They make two typical mistakes thereafter – firstly they seem to fail in most cases to inculcate what you need to DO in order to control your skis.  They try, they give demonstrations, they tell what to do in a command style of teaching but frequently that seems to fail.

Secondly they have a tendency to move you onto steeper slopes too soon rather than too late.

For practice to be effective you need an environment – the slope and snow quality – to be absolutely predictable and non-frightening.  If it isn’t, your attention will be scattered to the four winds.  That’s one of the reasons that ski pistes are groomed.

Some environments are worse than unpredictable.

The difficulties presented by steeper slopes often surprise.  Going onto them – especially if you take them on in one big chunk, all the way down – will likely give you too many challenges.

It isn’t only the steepness.  Steeper slopes challenge everybody as well.  Not all of them will be good skiers.  Mediocre skiers cut up steeper slopes and make them lumpy and “scraped” and irregular, and unpredictable.  None of this is what you need, thank you very much!

For any skier, never mind nervous skiers seeking to improve, you can only develop skill by sensing the feedback your environment gives you.  So you need the feedback and you need sufficient spare attention capacity to be aware of the feedback.

Daniel Khaneman, psychologist and Nobel Prize winner, Thinking,Fast and Slow (you can get it second hand for £2:42 which is a disgrace – it’s worth a fortune) quotes learning to use the brakes on your car.  You gradually mastered the skill of taking curves, and this involved learning when to press the brake pedal, when not to, when to lift off, and how hard to depress it.

As he says -“the conditions for learning this skill are ideal, because you receive immediate and unambiguous feedback every time.  The mild reward of a comfortable curve or the mild punishment of one that proves difficult because you got it wrong”.

It all depends on the quality and the speed of the feedback.  Try learning that driving skill on icy roads and the process may take longer than you hoped.

A simple “rule of three”.

The best way nervous skiers can improve their skiing is

  1.  First identify what movement you will make once you get moving, in order to tell you skis what to do.
  2.  Then ensure you only practice that on the least challenging slope for you – whatever that is.
  3. Constantly work to be aware of what you feel as you do it.  Don’t think! It’s not about thinking, good practice is about feeling.

Hope this helps, there’s loads more in other posts here, and on my website.

Bob

 

 

How to find skiing lessons for nervous skiers

How to find skiing lessons for nervous skiers –  That was the question that arose a month or so ago when we were filming a new Bobski.com DVD on how I teach.  See the first clip on my new Facebook page here https://www.facebook.com/bobskicontrolledskiing

Skiing lessons for nervous skiers

Confidence! That’s what you need.

According to my pupils the answer was – nowhere it would seem. Some of the skiers I had with me were clearly pretty apprehensive about the process. So I asked some of them who had been effective in helping them in their search for how to overcome their fear of skiing.  Nobody had.  No ski schools had helped. Skiing with their partners and friends had not helped. Trying to “get the miles in” had made it worse rather than better.

This made me very sad – for a considerable number of years being out on the ski slopes had been a trial rather than a pleasure for them. I had myself been in that very situation for 8 long years until I was lucky enough to chance upon a first rate skiing coach.

This apprehension seems to apply to both men and women, though the men find it harder to admit it. Not all men and women but a surprisingly large percentage. Skiing is such a marvelous experience that it makes people continue to go every year, but the skiing itself loads a very large number of people with considerable anxiety. How sad. How curable!  Not only anxiety but disappointment – returning home year after year having made no progress.

Nervous skiers can change this around

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